Category Archives: Change

Spiritual wisdom from the ’70s

A confirmed bookaholic, I have stuffed bookshelves in every room of my house, except the kitchen and bathroom. I store books I’m not currently using but think I might want to refer to again in my basement, and yesterday, going through them, I discovered these spiritual gems from From Survival Into the 21st Century: Planetary Healers Manual by Viktoras Kulvinskas, 1975:

“God has a plan. There are no accidents. Don’t complain about seeming badness. Get into God’s trip. Listen in silence. God is calling all of us.

Everything is going according to his cosmic plan. In our present patriarchal world, the desire to control Nature has created poisonous chemicals, pollution, war, murder, famine, plague, and the rape and devaluation of women. Chemicalized and junk foods, liquor, and Madison Avenue conditioning have made us all sick, made us all pause to question our pop-a-pill-for-what-ails-you culture. These poisons are sacred. They have been our teachers. Bless them and thank them.

The coming deluge will herald a civilization based on the universal, timeless teachings of the ancient masters and the disinherited healers of history: women. Survivors will be few – no more than 10% of the world’s population. They will be conscious of natural laws and the corrective measures evoked by disobedience.

Serve your brothers and sisters. Ask nothing. Give everything. Lovingly accept what is offered. Love when nothing is offered. Sing in praise for a chance to serve, not because others need help, but because you may become one with them. In helping, you are being helped. All have something to teach.

In your desire to serve, don’t lay your trip on anybody. It’s all right [even great] for us to be different even though we are one.

Just give. The more you give, the more you have. Giving up material possessions uncovers spiritual richness and contentment with ‘nothing,’ which becomes everything when immersed in the radiance of loving and living in the moment.”

We knew in the ’60s and ’70s that our country and our culture were on the wrong path, that, as Kulvinskas says, we need to move from Piscean materialism to Aquarian spirituality. It didn’t happen then — these changes aren’t as easy as growing long hair, smoking dope, and moving to the country. They still need to happen though, more than ever.

I love Kulvinskas’s introductory words, which remind me of the famous Hopi prophecy on my bulletin board, but I’m discarding the book, most of which advocates a wheatgrass and sprouts diet with lots of fasting, and implies that someday we’ll be able to live on air.

Take what you like and leave the rest.

 

Harnessing the power of social media for positive change (revolution)

Something a friend just posted on Facebook got me wondering why we entrust so much of what’s inside our minds to this commercial, already proven untrustworthy social media platform. Perhaps most of its appeal is that so many people use it, so not only will most of your friends and family see your posts (and you theirs), but, potentially — at least, in your imagination — you could be communicating with any or all of FB’s over 4 trillion users. That’s powerful. But so is FB’s ability to control and use what’s happening on its site, probably not to your or the world’s benefit — just to its own bottom line. For example, my friend says FB’s now using a new algorithm limiting what you see from friends to just 25 of them.

It seems incredible to me that with all the intelligent minds out there and all the concern so many of us have about our society, country, and planet that nothing better has been devised. Wouldn’t this be a key tool for positive change agents? I’m talking about a free, open-source, social media platform with guaranteed privacy but global reach — a way for us to share our ideas and organizing worldwide without worrying about it not actually getting out there, it’s being used against us, etc. I did some internet searching this morning, and couldn’t find anything recent or widespread that would fit this bill. So, computer nerds, what do you say? Isn’t is past time to create a tool like this? Harness the internet for positive change/revolution?

Please give me feedback on this, especially if you think I’m missing something that’s already out there.

What really matters

David Korten, author of books like “When Corporations Rule the World” and “The Great Turning: From Empire to Earth Community,” is one of our wise elders, if anyone is. He has an article in the current “Yes!” magazine that cuts through all the chatter and gets us back to what is perhaps the key question: Why are we knowingly heading toward the extinction of our (and many other) species? The answer is probably that one of the traits of our species is to focus on the short rather than the long term. But, like Korten, I believe we can, if we really want to, make some very important, much saner choices that will enable us to avoid falling off the cliff. As Korten says in his article, “Transformation begins with clarity on the nature of the choice that confronts our species.”

Korten believes we’ll survive only if we answer the following question: “Why does the current system deprive so many of opportunity for a fulfilling life [or life at all] that could and should be everyone’s birthright? Our prevailing cultural choices favor extreme individualistic competition for material goods. Our institutional choices reward the destruction of Earth’s capacity to support life and concentrate control by fewer and fewer people over what remains of that capacity. The many are thus pressed into lives of desperate servitude to the few. The obvious alternative begins with the recognition that individually and collectively, we survive and thrive only as interdependent, sharing, and mutually contributing members of Earth’s community of life. We’re better served by working together to create a world that works for all, than by competing for what remains of a shrinking pool of real [natural] wealth. Our defining cultural value must become cooperation. And we must transfer power from institutions that reward predatory competition to ones that facilitate and reward cooperation in service to the common good.”

Of course, the big question is how to make these changes? I think it’s pretty obvious that we earthlings can only do it by creating grassroots, bottom-up democracies all over the world like the kind the United States has always crushed at home and abroad. Of course, other regimes have and are crushing democracy, too, but I focus on our country because that’s where I live and because the US is so powerful. (Check out other articles on this site for examples of its democracy-crushing — US policy in Nicaragua and the rest of Central America comes to mind — as well as ideas about creating real democracy. One definition of the latter would be a system in which if a decision affects you or your community, you have real input in making it.

These are changes that can only take place in the long term. So take your eyes off most of the short term — like the daily “news” stream — and focus on what makes it all happen: what really matters.

The answer to almost all our problems

The answer to almost all our problems, according to Helen Norberg-Hodge, is to wiggle out of the corporate economic and political dictatorship of the current global economy by re-localizing economically and politically. If you’ve heard this before and thought it sounded too hard, read Norberg-Hodge’s long, but extremely important article at http://longreads.tni.org/localisation-solution-authoritarianism. You can also listen to her speak on the subject on thisishell.com (the June 15th show). Best of all, go to the mothership website: localfutures.org.

It’s a matter of understanding how the corporate global economy disrupts people’s lives, creating fertile ground for hatred between ethnic and religious groups and authoritarianism; makes it impossible for the majority to earn a living wage, or in many areas even feed themselves; and is destroying the earth and its climate. What can we do? — the perennial question — is answered, at least in introductory fashion, in the above-mentioned article and at local futures.org.

Please give this important thinker and activist and her colleagues a bit of your time and attention. They’ve been working on these issues for decades and know what they’re talking about. If what they say seems to go against the grain of commonly accepted “truths,” that’s because the media most of us are exposed to are corporate-dominated. The parameters of the discussion are too narrow — let’s open them up!

Disposable people

Not only does yesterday’s executive order reversing Trump’s policy of separating families at the border do nothing about the three to four thousand separated children now suffering psychological damage in ICE facilities, it raises the specter of families detained together indefinitely in ICE camps — an equally scary and inhumane policy.

Guatemalans and others are fleeing dangers many of which have been created by past US foreign policy, so, in fact, we owe them a safe refuge.

We need to demand an end to all policies and practices based on the idea that certain large groups of people are dispensable, disposable, and not to be cared about. Look around — there are many — US support for the Saudi war against Yemeni civilians and for the Israeli war against Palestinians being glaring examples.

Oh, yeah — almost all of these “disposable” people are poor and black or brown. And the people creating the policies killing them, at least in this country, are white hypocritical “Christians.” But as the vestments worn by the leaders of the Poor People’s Campaign say, “Jesus was a poor man.” His work developed out of similar cruelty and oppression — in this case, by the Roman Empire — against the poor, brown people of Judea. No way would he support the cruelty and oppression perpetrated and supported by the American Empire against “disposable” (because powerless) people today.

Well, you know what? We’re not powerless if we join together and demand something different. Let’s do that. Power to the people!